Skip to main content

Micro-Segmentation

 According to VMware, “Micro-segmentation enables organizations to logically divide its data center into distinct security segments down to the individual workload level, and then define security controls and deliver services for each unique segment.” (Lawrence Miller, CISSP and Joshua Soto, 2015, p. 21) The benefit of micro-segmentation is that it denies an attacker the opportunity to pivot laterally within the internal network, even after the perimeter has been breached.

VMware NSX-T supports micro-segmentation as it allows for a centrally controlled, yet distributed firewall to be attached directly to workloads within an organization’s network. The distribution of the firewall for the application of security policy to protect individual workloads is effective as rules can be applied that are specific to the requirements of each workload. The additional value that NSX-T provides is that the capabilities of NSX are not limited to homogenous vSphere environments, but support the heterogeneity of platforms and infrastructure that is more commonly used with many organizations today. Figure 7 depicts micro-segmentation capabilities of NSX, where each workload is virtual secured with its own distributed firewall.




Micro-segmentation provided by NSX-T better supports a Zero Trust architecture for IT security such that it allows for perimeters to be established around each workload. The Zero Trust architecture was introduced by analyst firm Forrester Research as an alternative approach to IT security architecture. Conventional security models assume that everything on the inside of an organization’s network can be trusted, whereas the Zero Trust model assumes the opposite: that nothing can be trusted and everything should be verified. The Zero Trust model for IT security is a principle that addresses the increased sophistication of network attacks and insider threats. 

Rather than simply placing firewalls at the edge of the organization’s network to prevent attacks from external networks, the Zero Trust model looks at ways to better control and manage network traffic within the organization’s network. The intent is that for each system in an organization’s network, trust of the underlying network is completely removed. To do this, organizations can define perimeters within the network to limit the possibility of lateral (east-west)movement of an attacker. Implementation of a Zero Trust model of IT security with traditional network security solutions designed primarily to protect the organization’s edge can be costly and complex. 

Moreover, the lack of visibility for organization’s internal networks can slow down implementation of a Zero Trust architecture and possibly leave gaps that may only be discovered during a breach. Additionally, internal perimeters may only have granularity down to a VLAN or subnet, as is common with many traditional DMZs. However, network virtualization solutions like NSX and NSX-T can provide a more cost effective and efficient means to implement a Zero Trust network

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Changing the FQDN of the vCenter appliance (VCSA)

This article states how to change the system name or the FQDN of the vCenter appliance 6.x You may not find any way to change the FQDN from the vCenter GUI either from VAMI page of from webclient as the option to change the hostname always be greyed out. Now the option left is from the command line of VCSA appliance. Below steps will make it possible to change the FQDN of the VCSA from the command line. Access the VCSA from console or from Putty session. Login with root permission Use above command in the command prompt of VCSA : /opt/vmware/share/vami/vami_config_net Opt for option 3 (Hostname) Change the hostname to new name Reboot the VCSA appliance.   After reboot you will be successfully manage to change the FQDN of the VCSA . Note: Above step is unsupported by VMware and may impact your SSL certificate and face problem while logging to vSphere Web Client. If you are using self-signed certificate, you can regenerate the certificate with the

Unable to poweron the VM. (Failed to lock the file)

I have encountered may issues like where after some upgrade or migration we were unable to power on the VM. Figure 1 An error was received from the ESX host while powering on VM HSSVSQL01. Failed to start the virtual machine. Cannot open the disk '/vmfs/volumes/578d835c-18b2c97a-9b0d-0025b5f13920/SAMPLE1_cloud/000000.vmdk' or one of the snapshot disks it depends on. Failed to lock the file In above Figure:1, where while powering on the VM, its prompt for an error. Well, there are several reason for where the VM unable to poweron and you can find many article on this. Here in this article we will discuss to resolve this issue. Please use below step to resolve the disk lock issue  C hecked that VM is running on snapshot if its getting error " VM Consolidation required". Checked the snapshot manager if its showing any snapshot. If yes, try to delete the  snapshot. Verified the same from Esxi cl

VM Creation Date & Time from Powercli

Most of the times we have several requirement when we talk about IT environment like designing , deployment , compliance check or for Security auditing the environment. Somewhere during security auditing we require to provide several information to security team to get successful audit. One of them is the compliance of Virtual machine auditing of creation date and time. Here into this post we will explore how to get the creation date and time of virtual machine hosted into the vCenter or ESXi. To get the details we will use VMware Powercli to extract the details. By default there is no function added into Powercli to get such details, so here we will add a function of vm creation date. Below is the function which needed to be copy and paste into the Powercli. ======================================================================= function  Get-VMCreationTime  {     $vms  =  get-vm     $vmevts  = @()     $vmevt  =  new-object  PSObject     for