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Showing posts from October, 2018

RAM Disk Full Due To Inodes In ESXi Host

Last week I got into issue where one of my ESXi host was prompting error while creating virtual machine. I verified the task and events of ESXi host and found below error generating while creating Virtual machine "A general system error occured: Failed to open "/var/log/vmware/journel/ for write: There is no space ". While further digging, I identified the ESXi host from where its generating this error from Task and Event section in vCenter. Tried to take SSH of the question ESXi host but its was inaccessible via putty. However, ESXi host was up and running fine. Last option left to access the ESXi host from its management console which is ILO as its ESXi installed on HP server. Also you can try accessing the SSH via other ESXi host or Linux machine using below command ssh -T servername. However, this will not give your prompt but you can type the command to get the output, but that was not giving any luck at that time so we use ILO for further troublesho

RAM Disk full on ESXi host

Sometime we used to get issue where were are not able to perform vMotion or logging was unable to write under /var/log.. While trying to do some normal things – like vMotion. I noticed an error which states just “A general system error occurred.”  On further investigation, I found that the underlying message was an out of disk space message while trying to proceed with a Storage vMotion. Observations during issue While vMotion   – “A general system error occurred:” While performing Storage vMotion  – “/var/log/vmware/journal/xxxx error writing file. There is no space left on the device.” Steps during troubleshooting Go to Configuration tab on host in vCenter client, go to Security Profile, click Properties link on the Services section. Scroll down to SSH and highlight – click options – click start to start SSH service. Use putty or reflections to ssh to the host. If you get a connection rejected – root filesystem ramdisk is probably full. Go to console (either throug

Monitoring VCSA & PSC disk partitions from vRop's

In our day to day life we encounter many disk alert issue on different operating system when they move above predefined threshold size. Here, in this article we go through how we can set alert and notification of disk partitions of VCSA and PSC. Here we'll take example of VCSA 6.5 ( Appliance) which has following partitions in Guest OS as mentioned in Fig.1 Figure:1 Here we'll set alert of partitons like /storage/seat , /storage/db, /storage/autodeploy, /storage/log etc.. To start we defined we set of steps. Overall process of creating alert definition are below:   Create a Symptom > Add these symptoms to Alert Definition > Then create a Notification for the Alert Definitions What is Symptom: The symptom sets comprise an expression that is evaluated to determine if an alert should be triggered. To add one or more symptoms from the symptom list to an existing symptom set, drag the symptom from the list to the symptom set. To create a new symptom

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Changing the FQDN of the vCenter appliance (VCSA)

This article states how to change the system name or the FQDN of the vCenter appliance 6.x You may not find any way to change the FQDN from the vCenter GUI either from VAMI page of from webclient as the option to change the hostname always be greyed out. Now the option left is from the command line of VCSA appliance. Below steps will make it possible to change the FQDN of the VCSA from the command line. Access the VCSA from console or from Putty session. Login with root permission Use above command in the command prompt of VCSA : /opt/vmware/share/vami/vami_config_net Opt for option 3 (Hostname) Change the hostname to new name Reboot the VCSA appliance.   After reboot you will be successfully manage to change the FQDN of the VCSA . Note: Above step is unsupported by VMware and may impact your SSL certificate and face problem while logging to vSphere Web Client. If you are using self-signed certificate, you can regenerate the certificate with the

VM Creation Date & Time from Powercli

Most of the times we have several requirement when we talk about IT environment like designing , deployment , compliance check or for Security auditing the environment. Somewhere during security auditing we require to provide several information to security team to get successful audit. One of them is the compliance of Virtual machine auditing of creation date and time. Here into this post we will explore how to get the creation date and time of virtual machine hosted into the vCenter or ESXi. To get the details we will use VMware Powercli to extract the details. By default there is no function added into Powercli to get such details, so here we will add a function of vm creation date. Below is the function which needed to be copy and paste into the Powercli. ======================================================================= function  Get-VMCreationTime  {     $vms  =  get-vm     $vmevts  = @()     $vmevt  =  new-object  PSObject     for

Unable to poweron the VM. (Failed to lock the file)

I have encountered may issues like where after some upgrade or migration we were unable to power on the VM. Figure 1 An error was received from the ESX host while powering on VM HSSVSQL01. Failed to start the virtual machine. Cannot open the disk '/vmfs/volumes/578d835c-18b2c97a-9b0d-0025b5f13920/SAMPLE1_cloud/000000.vmdk' or one of the snapshot disks it depends on. Failed to lock the file In above Figure:1, where while powering on the VM, its prompt for an error. Well, there are several reason for where the VM unable to poweron and you can find many article on this. Here in this article we will discuss to resolve this issue. Please use below step to resolve the disk lock issue  C hecked that VM is running on snapshot if its getting error " VM Consolidation required". Checked the snapshot manager if its showing any snapshot. If yes, try to delete the  snapshot. Verified the same from Esxi cl